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Windows Server

Windows Server 2008 : Using Capacity-Analysis Tools (part 3) - Windows Performance Monitor

3/19/2011 9:21:43 AM

Windows Performance Monitor

The Performance Monitor in Windows Server 2008 R2, shown in Figure 9, has been modified since Windows Server 2008 as it no longer includes the Reliability Monitor snap-in. The Performance Monitor is composed of three main components: monitoring tools such as Performance Monitor, Data Collector Sets, and a reporting component. The Performance Monitor can be launched from within the Windows Server 2008 R2 Server Manager or from the Start, All Programs, Administrative Tools menu.

Figure 9. Performance Monitor in Windows 2008 R2.

Using Performance Monitor, administrators can identify bottlenecks and pinpoint resource issues with applications, processes, or hardware. Monitoring these items can help identify and resolve issues, plan for capacity changes, and help establish baselines that can be used for analysis in the future. Upon launching the Performance Monitor, a summary of system performance is displayed, showing current memory, disk, processor, and network loads.

Performance Monitor

Many IT professionals rely on the Performance Monitor because it is bundled with the operating system, and it allows you to capture and monitor every measurable system object within Windows Server 2008 R2. Using the tool involves little effort to become familiar with it. You can find and start the Performance Monitor from within the Performance Monitor program under Monitoring Tools in the console view. The Performance Monitor, shown in Figure 10, is by far the best utility provided in the operating system for capacity-analysis purposes. With this utility, you can analyze data from virtually all aspects of the system both in real time and historically. This data analysis can be viewed through charts, reports, and logs. The log format can be stored for use later so that you can scrutinize data from succinct periods of time.

Figure 10. Performance Monitor expanded Data Collector Sets.

Data Collector Sets

As mentioned previously, Data Collector Sets are a collective grouping of items to be monitored. You can use one of the predefined sets or create your own to group together items that you want to monitor. Data Collector Sets are useful for several reasons. First, data collectors can be a common theme or a mix of items. For example, you could have one Data Collector Set that monitors only memory or a Data Collector Set that contains a myriad of items such as memory, disk usage, processor time, and more. Data Collector Sets can also be scheduled to run when needed. The Data Collector Sets section of the Performance Monitor is shown in Figure 11.

Figure 11. Data Collector Sets in Performance Monitor.

Reports

As previously discussed, the Performance Monitor includes an updated reporting mechanism and several template performance and diagnostic reports for use. In addition, reports can also be created manually or generated from Data Collector Sets. Three system reports are included for diagnosing and assessing system performance: LAN Diagnostics, System Diagnostics, and System Performance. The following steps outline the process to view a System Diagnostics report. Figure 12 shows a sample System Diagnostics report.

Figure 12. System Diagnostics report in Performance Monitor.

To create and view reports in Performance Monitor, do the following:

1.
Expand Data Collector Sets and System in the console tree of Performance Monitor.

2.
Right-click on either the System Diagnostics or System Performance sets and select Start. Windows will begin collecting data for the report.

3.
When you have collected enough data, right-click the collection set again, and select Stop.

4.
Expand Reports, System and click the collection set you chose earlier. Double-click the report listed under that performance set.

5.
The report will be compiled and displayed, as in Figure 34.12.
Other -----------------
- Windows Server 2008: Using Capacity-Analysis Tools (part 2) - Network Monitor
- Windows Server 2008: Using Capacity-Analysis Tools (part 1) - Task Manager
- Windows Server 2008: Defining Capacity Analysis
- Windows Server 2008: Performance and Reliability Monitoring (part 3) - Reports
- Windows Server 2008: Performance and Reliability Monitoring (part 2)
- Windows Server 2008: Performance and Reliability Monitoring (part 1)
- Windows Server 2008: Using Event Viewer for Logging and Debugging (part 3) - Conducting Additional Event Viewer Management Tasks
- Windows Server 2008: Using Event Viewer for Logging and Debugging (part 2)
- Windows Server 2008: Using Event Viewer for Logging and Debugging (part 1)
- Windows Server 2008: Using the Task Manager for Logging and Debugging (part 2)
- Windows Server 2008: Using the Task Manager for Logging and Debugging (part 1)
- Windows Server 2008: Enhancing Replication and WAN Utilization at the Branch Office
- Windows Server 2008: Understanding and Deploying BranchCache (part 3)
- Windows Server 2008: Understanding and Deploying BranchCache (part 2)
- Windows Server 2008: Understanding and Deploying BranchCache (part 1)
- Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Setting Security
- Windows Server 2008 Server Core : Creating LNK Files
- Configuring BitLocker Drive Encryption on a Windows Server 2008 R2 Branch Office Domain Controller (part 4)
- Configuring BitLocker Drive Encryption on a Windows Server 2008 R2 Branch Office Domain Controller (part 3) - Enabling BitLocker Drive Encryption when TPM Is Not Available
- Configuring BitLocker Drive Encryption on a Windows Server 2008 R2 Branch Office Domain Controller (part 2) - Enabling BitLocker Drive Encryption with TPM
 
 
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