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Windows Server
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Windows Server 2008: Installing a Read-Only Domain Controller (part 1)
RODCs can be implemented on a full or core installation of Windows Server 2008 or Windows Server 2008 R2. The installation can be performed in a standard or in a staged manner.
Windows Server 2008: Understanding Read-Only Domain Controllers (part 2) - Understanding When to Leverage RODCs
As you can see, branch offices were faced with numerous challenges. Because of the many features of RODCs, however, branch offices can now have domain controllers on site without compromising security.
Windows Server 2008: Understanding Read-Only Domain Controllers (part 1)
One of the new features that received close attention in Windows Server 2008 was a new breed of domain controllers referred to as Read-Only Domain Controllers, also known as RODCs
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding the Windows AIK (part 5) - Understanding Sysprep
You should use Sysprep only on new, clean installations of Windows. You should not use Sysprep on existing Windows installations, and you can’t use it on in-place-upgrade installations.
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding the Windows AIK (part 4) - Understanding ImageX and the .wim File Format
Imagex.exe is a command-line tool that enables you to manage Windows Imaging (.wim) files to perform image-based deployment of Windows onto bare-metal hardware. In the past, many system administrators deployed earlier versions of Windows by using third-party disk-imaging software
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding the Windows AIK (part 3) - Understanding Windows PE
Windows System Image Manager is the tool you use to create and manage answer files, which are used to perform unattended installs of Windows. Windows SIM provides a graphical user interface for creating new answer files and customizing the settings to be used for installing Windows
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding the Windows AIK (part 2) - Understanding Windows SIM and Answer Files
Windows System Image Manager is the tool you use to create and manage answer files, which are used to perform unattended installs of Windows. Windows SIM provides a graphical user interface for creating new answer files and customizing the settings to be used for installing Windows
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding the Windows AIK (part 1)
Some built-in operating system tools can be useful for deployment. Examples of such tools include DiskPart, BCDEdit, and others. This is discussed further in the next section and in the Command-Line Tools Technical Reference section of the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) User’s Guide.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 14) - Configuring Proxy Settings
A Windows Media Services server can also proxy requests from clients to reduce the load on the origin server. The Proxy tab includes settings for three modes of proxy options
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 13) - Configuring Caching Settings
The Cache tab enables you to specify storage space locations and limits. A proxy/cache server will attempt to store as much information as possible to reduce load on the origin server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 12) - Enabling Cache/Proxy
Managing network bandwidth and server resources when supporting large numbers of users can be difficult when using only a single Windows Media Services server. The server itself can often become a bottleneck and can lead to performance problems for clients
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 11) - Configuring Security for Windows Media Services
As with other types of network-accessible content, it is important to ensure that only authorized users have access to streamed audio and video. Some organizations provide content only to paid or registered users and want to prevent others from using network bandwidth.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 10)
Windows Media Services uses a plug-in–based architecture to configure the features and options available for each publishing point. To access these settings, select a publishing point using the Windows Media Services console, and then select the Properties tab.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 9) - Using the Multicast Announcement Wizard
When configuring publishing points that support multicast broadcasting of media streams, you can use the Multicast Announcement Wizard to create the necessary files. The Specify Files To Create page enables you to select the method by which you will provide links to a multicast stream
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 8) - Using the Unicast Announcement Wizard
If you have selected to deliver streaming content by using the unicast method, you can use the Unicast Announcement Wizard to configure the appropriate options. By default, unicast URLs are prefixed with the mms content type
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 7) - Using the Create Wrapper Wizard
After you have prepared a new publishing point for the Windows Media Services server, you will need a method to make the content available to users. The Windows Media Services console enables you to create announcements, which are a method of creating links and playlists for the content you want to make available.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 6) - Configuring Source Settings
Every publishing point must have source information to specify which media files will be available to users. As you learned in the previous section, you can specify the default information when you create a new publishing point by using the Add Publishing Point Wizard
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 5)
You can manage the status of publishing points, using the Windows Media Services console. To manage the status of a publishing point and to perform other administrative functions, right-click the appropriate object.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 4) - Creating a New Publishing Point
Publishing points are used to define the locations and types of content available to users of Windows Media Services.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 3) - Using Windows Media Services Management Tools
Windows Media Services has two main administrative tools. You can launch the Windows Media Services console by selecting Windows Media Services from the Administrative Tools program group.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 2) - Installing Streaming Media Services
The site will provide information about installing the Streaming Media Services server role using Server Manager. To begin the process, open Server Manager, right-click Roles, and select Add Roles. The Streaming Media Services role will appear in the list
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring Windows Media Services (part 1)
The technical requirements for providing access to audio and video media can differ significantly from requirements for other types of content. The Web Server (IIS) server role can provide access to many types of files to your users
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 6) - Using an SMTP Virtual Server
SMTP virtual servers can be accessed in several ways. Systems administrators can use the Telnet command-line utility to connect to an SMTP server directly and send commands or create messages.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 5)
You can define which Windows users may manage SMTP Virtual Server settings by using the Security tab. The list defines which users should be considered operators. Operators have permissions to change the configuration of the SMTP virtual server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 4) - Securing Access to an SMTP Virtual Server
To prevent unwanted use of SMTP virtual servers, it is important to configure access rules for sending messages by SMTP. A large portion of unsolicited commercial e-mail (spam) is sent through SMTP relays that are unprotected.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 3) - Configuring General SMTP Server Settings
To access the configuration settings for an SMTP virtual server, right-click it in IIS 6.0 Manager, and then select Properties. The General tab includes details that specify the network connection settings for the SMTP server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 2) - Creating a New SMTP Virtual Server
You can use the New SMTP Virtual Server Wizard to create a new SMTP virtual server in Windows Server 2008. Each virtual server has its own set of configuration settings and can be managed independently.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 1) - Installing the SMTP Server Feature
The Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP) feature in Windows Server 2008 enables you to relay e-mail messages. The SMTP standard provides a consistent method by which servers can send messages
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring FTP (part 14) - Using FTP Client Software
Users can use several types of FTP client options for connecting to an FTP server. Windows operating systems include the FTP command-line utility that provides basic text-based functionality for connecting to an FTP server.
Windows Server 2008 : Configuring FTP (part 13) - Configuring Directory Browsing
One of the most commonly used commands sent by FTP clients is to request a directory listing. Most FTP client software programs will automatically execute a LIST command whenever the user changes the current working folder.
 
 
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