Programming4us
         
 
 
Windows

Windows 7 : Understanding Control Panel Files

11/26/2010 11:49:24 AM
Many of the Control Panel icons represent Control Panel extension files, which use the .cpl extension. These files reside in the %SystemRoot%\System32 folder. When you open Control Panel, Windows 7 scans the System32 folder looking for CPL files, and then displays an icon for each one.

The CPL files offer an alternative method for launching individual Control Panel dialog boxes. The idea is that you run control.exe and specify the name of a CPL file as a parameter. This bypasses the Control Panel folder and opens the icon directly. Here’s the syntax:

control CPLfile [,option1 [, option2]]

CPLfile— The name of the file that corresponds to the Control Panel icon you want to open (see Table 1).

option1— This option is obsolete and is included only for backward compatibility with batch files and scripts that use Control.exe for opening Control Panel icons.

option2— The tab number of a multitabbed dialog box. Many Control Panel icons open a dialog that has two or more tabs. If you know the specific tab you want to work with, you can use the option2 parameter to specify an integer that corresponds to the tab’s relative position from the left side of the dialog box. The first (leftmost) tab is 0, the next tab is 1, and so on.

Note

If the dialog box has multiple rows of tabs, count the tabs from left to right and from bottom to top. For example, if the dialog box has two rows of four tabs each, the tabs in the bottom row are numbered 0 to 3 from left to right, and the tabs in the top row are numbered 4 to 7 from left to right.

Also, note that even though you no longer use the option1 parameter, you must still display its comma in the command line.


For example, to open Control Panel’s System icon with the Hardware tab displayed, run the following command (using the Start menu’s Search box or the Run command):

control sysdm.cpl,,2

Table 1 lists the various Control Panel icons and the appropriate command line to use. (Note, however, that some Control Panel icons—such as Taskbar and Start Menu—can’t be accessed by running Control.exe.)

Note

If you find your Control Panel folder is bursting at the seams, you can trim it down to size by removing those icons you never use. There are a number of ways you can do this in Windows 7, but the easiest is probably via group policies.

Other -----------------
- Windows 7 : Reviewing the Control Panel Icons
- Windows 7 : Touring the Control Panel Window
- Windows 7 : Reviewing Event Viewer Logs
- Windows 7 : Checking for Updates and Security Patchess
- Windows 7 : Backing Up Your Files
- Windows 7 : Preparing for Trouble
- Windows 7 : Defragmenting Your Hard Disk
- Windows 7 : Deleting Unnecessary Files
- Windows 7 : Checking Free Disk Space
- Windows 7 : Checking Your Hard Disk for Errors
- Windows Azure : Understanding Message Operations
- Windows Azure : Understanding Queue Operations
- Windows Azure Queue Overview
- Tuning Windows 7’s Performance : Optimizing Virtual Memory
- Tuning Windows 7’s Performance : Optimizing the Hard Disk
- Tuning Windows 7’s Performance : Optimizing Applications
- Tuning Windows 7’s Performance : Optimizing Startup
- Tuning Windows 7’s Performance : Monitoring Performance
- Windows Vista - File Encryption : Workings of BitLocker Drive Encryption
- Windows Vista - File Encryption : Encryption File System
 
 
Most View
- Exchange Server 2007 : Use Managed Content Settings
- BizTalk Server 2009 : Using asynchronous services in WCF (part 3) - Building a client-side asynchronous experience
- Sharepoint 2010 : Content Management - In place Records Management
- Windows 7 : Setting Up User Security - Renaming Built-In Accounts for Better Security
- SharePoint 2010 : Using Data Connection Libraries (part 1) - Connecting to Data Using Alternative Credentials & Configuring the Secure Store Service
- Overview of Internet Explorer 8 (part 3) - Using New Security and Safety Features of IE8 & Working with SmartScreen Filters
- SQL Server 2012 : T-SQL Enhancements - The MERGE Statement (part 1)
- SQL Server 2008 Scheduling and Notification : Configuring the SQL Server Agent
- Windows Small Business Server 2011 : Deploying a Second Domain Controller
- Exchange server 2010 : Troubleshooting Tools (part 1)
Top 10
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 3) - Configuring Recipient Filtering
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 2)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 1)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Installing and Configuring the Edge Transport Server Components
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 7) - BCS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - SEARCH
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - WEB CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 5) - ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 4) - WORKFLOWS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 3) - REMOTE EVENTS