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Windows

Windows 7 : Make Windows Shut Down Services Faster

12/1/2010 7:59:49 PM
If it seems to take Windows forever to shut down, the culprit might be all those services that it has running because Windows has to shut down each service one by one before it can shut down the PC. In each case, Windows waits a certain amount of time for the service to close, and if it hasn’t closed in that time, Windows kills the service. It’s that waiting for services to shut themselves down that can really bring the shutdown process to its knees.

However, most services shut down as soon as they get the command from Windows. So although it’s polite of Windows to give some services a bit of extra time, it’s really wasted time because in most cases Windows is just going to have to kill those slow services anyway. So in that case, you should configure Windows 7 to tell it to kill services faster. Here’s how:

1.
Select Start, type regedit, and then press Enter. The Registry Editor appears.

2.
Navigate to the following key:

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control

3.
Double-click the WaitToKillServiceTimeout setting.

4.
Reduce the value from 20000 to 1000.

5.
Click OK.

Tip

You can also reduce the amount of time that Windows 7 waits before killing running applications at shutdown. In the Registry Editor, navigate to the following key:

HKCU\Control Panel\Desktop

Double-click the WaitToKillAppTimeout setting. (If you don’t see this setting, select Edit, New, String Value, type WaitToKillAppTimeout, and click OK.) Change the value to 5000, and click OK
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