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Windows

Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 1)

3/23/2011 9:29:31 AM
At this point, you could use your website as is and just continue adding web pages, folders, and other content. However, IIS Manager offers a number of features and settings that enable you control your website and to customize its look and feel. For example, you can stop and start the website, change the default name of the site, and specify the default content page.

Stopping Your Website

By default, when you start Windows 7, the World Wide Web Publishing Service starts automatically, and that service automatically starts your website. This is reasonable behavior because in most cases you’ll want your website available full time (that is, as long as the Windows 7 computer is running). However, there might be occasions when you don’t want your site to be available:

  • If you plan on making major edits to the content, you might prefer to take the site offline while you make the changes.

  • You might only want your website available at certain times of the day.

  • If you’re developing a web application, certain changes may require that you stop and then restart the website.

For these and similar situations, you can stop the website. Here are the steps to follow:

1.
Open IIS Manager.

2.
Select Computer, Sites, Default Web Site (where Computer is the name of the computer running IIS).

3.
In the Actions pane, click Stop. (You can also right-click Default Web Site and then select Manage Web Site, Stop.) IIS Manager stops the website.

Tip

If you’d prefer that your website not start automatically when you log on to Windows 7, select Default Web Site, and then click Advanced Settings in the Actions pane. (You can also right-click Default Web Site, and then click Advanced Settings.) In the Start Automatically setting, select False, and then click OK.

If you only want your website to not start the next time you launch Windows 7, stop the site and then shut down Windows 7. When you next log on to Windows 7, your website won’t start. Note, however, that if you then restart the website during the Windows 7 session, the website will start automatically the next time you start Windows 7.


Restarting Your Website

When you’re ready to get your website back online, follow these steps to restart it:

1.
Open IIS Manager.

2.
Select Computer, Sites, Default Web Site (where Computer is the name of the computer running IIS).

3.
In the Actions pane, click Start. (You can also right-click Default Web Site and then select Manage Web Site, Start.) IIS Manager starts the website.

Tip

If your website is stuck or behaving erratically, you can often solve the problem by stopping and restarting the site. However, instead of performing two separate operations—clicking Stop and then clicking Start—IIS Manager lets you perform both actions in one shot by clicking Restart.


Renaming the Default Website

The name Default Web Site is innocuous enough, I suppose, but it’s a bit on the bland side. If you prefer to use a more interesting name, follow these steps to change it:

1.
Open IIS Manager.

2.
Open the Computer, Sites branch (where Computer is the name of the computer running IIS).

3.
Right-click Default Web Site, and then click Rename in the shortcut menu. IIS Manager adds a text box around the name.

4.
Type the new name for the website.

5.
Press Enter.

Caution

When you rename the site, the new name can be up to 259 characters long, but you must be sure to not use any of the following illegal characters:

@ $ & = + | \ ; : “ ’ , < > / ?


Changing the Website Location

By default, your website’s home folder is the wwwroot folder, but that isn’t necessarily permanent. You may decide to move the website to a different home folder, or you may decide to rename the existing folder. In either case, you must use IIS Manager to specify the new home folder. Here are the steps to follow:

1.
Open IIS Manager.

2.
Open the Computer, Sites branch (where Computer is the name of the computer running IIS).

3.
Select Default Web Site.

4.
Click Features View.

5.
In the Actions pane, click Basic Settings to open the Edit Web Site dialog box, shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Use the Edit Web Site dialog box to change the site’s home folder.

6.
To specify the website’s new home folder, you have three choices:

  • If the folder exists and you know the full pathname (drive and folders), type it in the Physical Path text box.

  • If the folder exists and you’re not sure of the full pathname (or it’s too long to type), click the Browse (...) button, use the Browse for Folder dialog box to select the folder, and then click OK.

  • If the folder doesn’t exist, click Browse (...), use the Browse for Folder dialog box to select the folder within which you want the new folder to appear, click Make New Folder, type the folder name, press Enter, and then click OK.

7.
Click OK.
Other -----------------
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 3) - Adding a Folder to the Default Website
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 2) - Changing the Default Website Home Page
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 1) - Setting Permissions on the Default Website Folder
- Turning Windows 7 into a Web Server : Understanding the Default Website
- Turning Windows 7 into a Web Server : Accessing Your Website
- Windows 7 : Installing Internet Information Services
- Windows 7 : Using Virtual Private Network Connections
- Windows 7 : Using Dynamic DNS to Access Your Network & Configuring a Network Computer for Remote Administration
- Windows 7 : Connecting to a Remote Desktop via the Internet
- Windows 7 : Connecting to the Remote Desktop (part 2) - Making an Advanced Connection
- Windows 7 : Connecting to the Remote Desktop (part 1) - Making a Basic Connection
- Windows 7 : Setting Up the Remote Computer as a Host (part 2) - Configuring XP to Act as a Remote Desktop Host
- Windows 7 : Setting Up the Remote Computer as a Host (part 1) - Configuring Windows 7 or Vista to Act as a Remote Desktop Host
- Windows 7 : Working with Network Files Offline (part 6) - Dealing with Synchronization Conflicts
- Windows 7 : Working with Network Files Offline (part 5) - Synchronizing Your Offline Files
- Windows 7 : Working with Network Files Offline (part 4) - Working with Network Files While You’re Offline
- SOA with .NET and Windows Azure : WCF Discovery (part 3) - Discovery Proxies for Managed Discovery & Implicit Service Discovery
- SOA with .NET and Windows Azure : WCF Discovery (part 2) - Locating a Service Ad Hoc & Sending and Receiving Service Announcements
- SOA with .NET and Windows Azure : WCF Discovery (part 1) - Discovery Modes
- Windows 7 : Working with Network Files Offline (part 3) - Prohibiting a Network Folder from Being Made Available Offline & Encrypting Offline Files
 
 
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