Programming4us
         
 
 
Windows

Adding Macs to Your Windows 7 Network : Connecting to a Windows Shared Folder

4/29/2011 6:16:04 PM
Mac OS X support for connecting to shared Windows folders is turned on by default, so connecting your Mac to a Windows PC on your network and selecting a shared folder requires no prep work on your part.

How you go about making the connection depends on whether your Mac “sees” the Windows PC. To check this, switch to Finder, and then do one of the following:

  • In the Sidebar, open the Shared section and look for an icon for the Windows PC.

  • Choose Go, Network (or press Shift+Command+K) and use the Network window to look for an icon for the Windows PC.

Connecting to a Seen Windows PC

If you see an icon for the Windows PC, follow these steps to connect to it:

1.
Open the Windows PC icon.

2.
Click Connect As. Mac OS X displays the dialog box shown in Figure 1.

                                       Figure 1. When you connect to the Windows PC, you need to provide a username and password for an account on the PC.


Note

If you don’t know the username and password of an account on the Windows PC, select the Guest option instead. This gives you read-only access to the Windows PC’s shared folders.

3.
Select the Registered User option.

4.
Type a username and password for an account on the Windows PC.

5.
Click to activate the Remember This Password in My Keychain check box.

6.
Click Connect. Mac OS X presents a list of the shared folders on the Windows PC, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. After you connect to the Windows PC, choose the shared folder you want to mount in Finder.


7.
Select the folder you want to mount, and then click OK. Mac OS X mounts the shared folder in Finder and displays the folder’s contents.

Connecting to an Unseen Windows PC

If your Windows PC doesn’t show up in the Sidebar or the Network window, first make sure it’s turned on and not in sleep mode. If you still don’t see it, follow these steps to make the connection:

1.
In Finder, choose Go, Connect to Server (or press Command+K). The Connect to Server dialog box appears.

Tip

You can also right-click (or Control+click if you have a one-button mouse) the Finder icon in the Dock and then click Connect to Server.

2.
In the Server Address text box, type smb://WindowsPC, where WindowsPC is either the name of the Windows computer you want to connect to or its IP address. See Figure 3 for an example.

Figure 3. If you don’t see the Windows PC in Finder, use the Connect to Server command to connect to the PC directly.


3.
If you want to save this address as a favorite (for example, if you plan on connecting to the Windows PC regularly), click the Add icon (+) to insert the address in the Favorite Servers list (again, see Figure 3 for some examples).

Tip

Rather than saving the address as a favorite, you can click the Recent Servers icon (it’s the one to the right of the Add icon) and then click the server you want from the list that appears.

4.
Click Connect. Your Mac prompts you for the credentials of a user account on the Windows PC.

5.
Select the Registered User option.

6.
Type a username and password for an account on the Windows PC.

7.
Click to activate the Remember This Password in My Keychain check box.

8.
Click Connect. Your Mac displays a list of the Windows PC’s shared folders.

9.
Select the folder you want to mount, and then click OK. Mac OS X mounts the shared folder in Finder and displays the folder’s contents.

Working with the Windows PC’s Shared Folders

When you first connect to a Windows share, Mac OS X mounts the shared folder in Finder and displays the folder’s contents, as shown in Figure 4. You can then work with the folder’s contents just like any other shared network folder (assuming, of course, that your Mac has compatible applications installed).

Figure 4. After you mount the Windows PC’s shared folder, the folder contents appear in a Finder window.

To switch to a different shared folder on the Windows PC, you have two choices:

  • In the Finder’s Sidebar, click the icon for the Windows PC.

  • In Finder, select Go, Network (or press Shift+Command+K) to open the Network window, and then double-click the icon for the Windows PC.

Either way, Mac OS X displays the PC’s shared folders, as shown in Figure 5. Open the folder you want to work with.

Figure 5. Open the Windows PC in Finder to see the PC’s shared folders.

Unmounting a Windows Shared Folder

When you’ve completed your work with the Windows PC, you can unmount the PC by using either of the following techniques:

  • In the Finder’s Sidebar, click the Eject icon that appears to the right of the icon for the Windows PC (see Figure 5).

  • In Finder, select Go, Network (or press Shift+Command+K) to open the Network window, double-click the icon for the Windows PC, and then click the Disconnect button.

Backing Up Mac Data to a Windows Shared Folder

Besides working with the files on a Windows share in a Mac OS X application, you can use a Windows 7 share to store Mac OS X backups. This is handy if you don’t have a second hard drive attached to your Mac, or if your backups are too big to burn to a DVD. The easiest way to do this in Mac OS X is to use the Disk Utility to archive a folder or the entire system to an image file on a Windows 7 share. Here’s how it’s done:

1.
In Windows 7, create a share to store the Mac OS X backup.

2.
Follow the steps given earlier in this article to mount the new share in Mac OS X.

3.
Click the Finder icon in the Dock.

4.
Select Applications, Utilities, and then double-click Disk Utility. Mac OS X launches the Disk Utility application.

5.
If you want to back up your entire system, click Macintosh HD in the Disk Utility window.

6.
Select File, New, and then select either Disk Image from Folder or Disk Image from disk (Macintosh HD), where disk is the name of your Mac’s hard disk.

7.
If you selected Disk Image from Folder, the Select Folder to Image dialog box appears. Select the folder you want to back up, and then click Image.

8.
In the New Image dialog box, use the Save As text box to edit the filename, if desired.

9.
Select the Windows share that you mounted in step 2. Figure 6 shows an example that will save the image to the Backups folder on the mounted share named D on PAULSPC.

Figure 6. Select a shared folder on the mounted Windows PC to store the disk image.

10.
Click Save. Mac OS X creates the disk image on the Windows 7 share. (Depending on the amount of data you’re archiving, this may take several hours.)

11.
When the image creation is done, select Disk Utility, Quit Disk Utility.
Other -----------------
- Adding Macs to Your Windows 7 Network : Connecting to the Windows Network
- Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 5) - Viewing the Server Logs
- Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 4) - Disabling Anonymous Access
- Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 3) - Working Without a Default Document
- Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 2) - Setting the Website’s Default Document
- Windows 7 : Controlling and Customizing Your Website (part 1)
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 3) - Adding a Folder to the Default Website
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 2) - Changing the Default Website Home Page
- Windows 7 : Adding Folders and Files to the Default Website (part 1) - Setting Permissions on the Default Website Folder
- Turning Windows 7 into a Web Server : Understanding the Default Website
- Turning Windows 7 into a Web Server : Accessing Your Website
- Windows 7 : Installing Internet Information Services
- Windows 7 : Using Virtual Private Network Connections
- Windows 7 : Using Dynamic DNS to Access Your Network & Configuring a Network Computer for Remote Administration
- Windows 7 : Connecting to a Remote Desktop via the Internet
- Windows 7 : Connecting to the Remote Desktop (part 2) - Making an Advanced Connection
- Windows 7 : Connecting to the Remote Desktop (part 1) - Making a Basic Connection
- Windows 7 : Setting Up the Remote Computer as a Host (part 2) - Configuring XP to Act as a Remote Desktop Host
- Windows 7 : Setting Up the Remote Computer as a Host (part 1) - Configuring Windows 7 or Vista to Act as a Remote Desktop Host
- Windows 7 : Working with Network Files Offline (part 6) - Dealing with Synchronization Conflicts
 
 
Most View
- Programming WCF Services : Queued Services - Delivery Failures (part 2) - Processing the Dead-Letter Queue
- Exchange Server 2010 : Troubleshooting Federated Delegation (part 1) - Troubleshooting the Federation Trust
- SQL Server 2008 : Developing Custom Managed Database Objects (part 5) - Developing Managed User-Defined Aggregates
- Exchange Server 2010: Configure Security for Exchange Servers (part 1)
- Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 2) - Creating a New SMTP Virtual Server
- Windows Vista : Managing Local Logon Accounts
- Windows 7 Customization : Working with Existing File Types
- Windows Server 2008: Installing a Read-Only Domain Controller (part 3)
- Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 : Using the Concurrency Visualizer (part 2) - CPU Utilization View, The Threads View
- Exchange Server 2010 : Manage Database Redundancy (part 2) - Manage Database Replication
Top 10
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 3) - Configuring Recipient Filtering
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 2)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 1)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Installing and Configuring the Edge Transport Server Components
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 7) - BCS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - SEARCH
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - WEB CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 5) - ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 4) - WORKFLOWS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 3) - REMOTE EVENTS