Programming4us
         
 
 
Windows

Windows Vista - Sharing Files and Folders : Accessing a Shared Folder

11/16/2010 3:17:12 PM
After you share a file or folder, users can connect to it as a network resource or map to it by using a driver letter on their machines. After a network drive has been mapped, users can access it just as they would a local drive on their computer.

To map a network drive to a shared file or folder, follow these steps:

1.
Click Start, and then click Computer.

2.
In Windows Explorer, click the Map Network Drive button on the toolbar. This displays the Map Network Drive dialog box.

3.
Use the Drive field to select a free drive letter to use, and then click the Browse button to the right of the Folder field.

4.
In the Browse for Folder dialog box, expand the Network folders until you can select the name of the workgroup or the domain with which you want to work. When you expand the name of a computer in a workgroup or a domain, you’ll see a list of shared folders. Select the shared folder you want to work with, and then click OK.

5.
Select Reconnect at Logon if you want Windows Vista to connect to the shared folder automatically at the start of each session.

6.
If your current logon doesn’t have appropriate access permissions for the share, click the Different User Name link. You can then enter the username and password of the account with which you want to connect to the shared folder. Typically, this feature is used by administrators who log on to their computers with a limited account and also have an administrator account for managing the network.

7.
Click Finish.

If you later decide you don’t want to map the network drive, click Start, and then click Computer. In Windows Explorer, under Network Location, right-click the network drive icon and choose Disconnect.

You can also type in a UNC in the Run box or the address bar in Windows Explorer. To display the Run box quickly, use the Windows logo key + R shortcut. If you don’t have a Windows logo key or if you prefer to use the mouse, you can add the Run option to the Start menu in Windows Vista, as follows:

1.
Right-click the Start button and choose Properties.

2.
On the Start Menu tab, click the Customize button to the right of the Start Menu option.

3.
In the Customize Start Menu dialog box, scroll down and place a check mark next to the Run option.

4.
Click OK to save your changes.
Other -----------------
- Windows Vista - Sharing Files and Folders : Standard Sharing
- Windows Vista - Sharing Files and Folders : Public Folder
- Windows Vista - Sharing Files and Folders : Network Discovery and Browsing
- Windows 7 : Manage Your Network - Working with a Homegroup
- Windows 7 : Manage Your Network - Creating a Homegroup
- Windows 7 : Manage Your Network - Connecting to a Network
- Multibooting Windows 7
- Windows 7 Customization : Working with Existing File Types
- Windows 7 Customization : Understanding File Types
- Windows Azure Service Life Cycle
- Backing Up and Restoring with ntbackup
- Windows Azure Service Management
- Windows Azure : Content Delivery Network
- Windows Azure Storage Services
- Windows Azure Storage Characteristics
- Microsoft Windows Vista : Using Parental Controls to Restrict Computer Usage
- Microsoft Windows Vista : Creating and Enforcing Bulletproof Passwords
- Windows 7 Customization : Taking Ownership of Your Files
- Windows 7 Customization : Stopping Delete Confirmations
- Windows 7 : Managing a User Account - Limiting Computer Access
 
 
Most View
- Windows 7: Troubleshooting Device Problems (part 2) - Displaying a List of Nonworking Devices
- SharePoint 2010 : Choose a Column Type (part 3)
- Service Management API (part 1)
- Cloud Security and Privacy : What Is the Data Life Cycle?
- SQL Server 2008: Administering Database Objects - Working with Tables (part 4) - Check Constraints
- Windows Server 2008 : Controlling Access to Web Services (part 7)
- Windows Server 2008 : Configuring SMTP (part 3) - Configuring General SMTP Server Settings
- SQL server 2012 : T-SQL Enhancements - Date and Time Data Types (part 1) - Date and Time Accuracy, Storage, and Format
- SharePoint 2010 : Choose a Column Type (part 1) - Single Line of Text
- Sharepoint 2010 : Content Management - In place Records Management
Top 10
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 3) - Configuring Recipient Filtering
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 2)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 1)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Installing and Configuring the Edge Transport Server Components
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 7) - BCS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - SEARCH
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - WEB CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 5) - ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 4) - WORKFLOWS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 3) - REMOTE EVENTS