Programming4us
         
 
 
SQL Server

SQL Azure : Azure Server Administration (part 2) - Firewall Settings

12/16/2010 4:43:40 PM

3.3.2. Firewall Settings

Because your databases are located in places you physically can't get to or control, Microsoft has implemented a mechanism to help protect your data. This protection mechanism is the SQL Azure firewall, which prevents restricted access to all your databases until you physically specify which computers have permission. Access to your SQL Azure databases is based on the originating IP address that makes a request.

To grant access to your SQL Azure databases, you specify a range of acceptable IP addresses in the Server Administration portal on the Firewall Settings tab, shown in Figure 3. IP address ranges are defined by rules that allow you to specify multiple firewall setting entries. For example, you can define an IP address range for your home as well as one for your office. If you attend a conference, you can define an additional rule and IP address that let you connect from that specific location. Also notice the "Allow Microsoft Services access to this server" check box on the Firewall Settings tab; it allows internal communication between Windows Azure services and SQL Azure databases.

Figure 3. Firewall Settings tab

To add a firewall rule, click the Add Rule button on the Firewall Settings tab to display the Add Firewall Rule dialog, shown in Figure 3-6. You're asked to specify the rule name and the IP address range. Firewall rule names must be unique, and there is no limit to the number of rules you can have.

Entering the IP Range is simple because the dialog tells you what your IP address is. Figure 4 uses the same value for the range's start and ending values to indicate that only the single specified address should be allowed to access the database. You can enter a range of IP address if you want multiple computers to access SQL Azure.

After you've entered your firewall rule information, click the Submit button. Your new rule is added to the Firewall Settings tab, as shown in Figure 5. As the note in Figure 3-6 states, it may be up to 5 minutes before your rule takes effect and you can connect to SQL Azure (although I have never had it take more than 1 minute to take affect). After that, you can edit and delete the rule.

Figure 4. Adding a firewall rule

Figure 5. New firewall rule
Other -----------------
- SQL Azure : Managing Your Azure Projects
- SQL Azure : Creating Your Azure Account
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 16) - Security and Roles
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 15) - SSIS
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 14) - Data Mining
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 13) - Cube Perspectives
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 12) - Generating a Relational Database
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 11)
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 10)
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 9) - Browsing Data in the Cube
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 8) - Aggregating Data Within the Cube
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 7) - Building and Deploying the Cube
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 6) - Creating the Cube
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 5) - Creating the Other Dimensions
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 4) - Defining Dimensions and Hierarchies
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 3) - Creating Data Source Views
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 2) - Adding a Data Source
- An OLAP Requirements Example: CompSales International (part 1)
- SQL Server 2008 Analysis Services : An Analytics Design Methodology
- SQL Azure : Other Considerations
 
 
Most View
- Visual Studio Team System 2008 : Web test editor (part 2) - Other request properties
- Windows 7 : Checking for Updates and Security Patchess
- SQL Server 2008 : Indexing for Performance - Putting It All Together (part 3) - Covering Your Queries
- ASP.NET 4 in VB 2010 : Site Maps (part 3) - Binding Portions of a Site Map, The SiteMap Class
- Managing Websites with IIS Manager (part 4) - Configuration
- Managing Security Within the Database Engine : Securables
- Manage Windows Server 2008 : Work with the Task Scheduler
- SQL Server 2012 : T-SQL Enhancements - The MERGE Statement (part 2)
- BizTalk Server 2009 : Consuming WCF services from orchestrations
- Visual Basic 2010 : Deploying Applications with ClickOnce - Security Considerations, Programmatically Accessing ClickOnce
Top 10
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 3) - Configuring Recipient Filtering
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 2)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Utilizing the Basic Sender and Recipient Connection Filters (part 1)
- Implementing Edge Services for an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Installing and Configuring the Edge Transport Server Components
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 7) - BCS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - SEARCH
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 6) - WEB CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 5) - ENTERPRISE CONTENT MANAGEMENT
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 4) - WORKFLOWS
- What's New in SharePoint 2013 (part 3) - REMOTE EVENTS