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SQL Server
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SQL Server Integration Services : Using bcp (part 1)
As you have seen in this article, it is fairly easy to create and implement SSIS packages to do data transformations from one or more data sources to one or more data destinations.
SQL Server Integration Services : Connection Projects in Visual Studio
Microsoft is trying to make it easier to get data sources or data targets defined and ready to utilize with SSIS packages. From Visual Studio, you can now create an Integration Services Connection project. A wizard takes you through defining the data sources and connections for an SSIS package.
SQL Server Integration Services : The Package Execution Utility (part 3) - The dtutil Utility
You use the dtutil command-line utility to copy, move, delete, or verify the existence of a package. These actions can be performed on any SSIS package, regardless of whether it is stored in a Microsoft SQL Server database, the SSIS package store, or at the filesystem.
SQL Server Integration Services : The Package Execution Utility (part 2) - Running Packages
The dtexec options are additive. Depending on what you are trying to do, you are able to string one or more options and their values together in the following form
SQL Server Integration Services : The Package Execution Utility (part 1)
The dtsrun utility in SQL Server 2000 is no longer used within SQL Server 2008. It has been taken over by the dtexec utility, which is bigger and better and has more options and values to serve your every SSIS package execution need
SQL Server Integration Services : The SSIS Designer
The SSIS Designer is extremely easy to use and gives a user the flexibility of editing and manipulating any of the package properties in any order needed, as opposed to the strict sequential order of the SSIS Wizard. After you have mastered all the package concepts, you will find that you will be spending most of your time using the SSIS Designer instead of the wizard.
SQL Server Integration Services : Running the SSIS Wizard
The SSIS Wizard is a streamlined interface solely used to generate SSIS packages for importing or exporting data. It is really quite powerful and provides an easy but sophisticated way to move data from or to any OLE DB, ODBC, or text source to another OLE DB, ODBC, or text source
SQL Server Integration Services : A Data Transformation Requirement
Let’s consider a true-life data export requirement that is best served by using SSIS. The requirement is for a small business intelligence data mart (on SQL Server 2008) to be spun off each week from the main OLTP database (also on SQL Server 2008) that addresses a product sales manager’s need to see the total year-to-date business that a customer has generated
SQL Server 2008 : SSIS Tools and Utilities
SSIS includes several tools that simplify package creation, execution, and management. These tools are available within the Visual Studio/BI Development Studio IDE or integrated into other component-based tools .
SQL Server 2008 : SSIS Architecture and Concepts
You can think of SSIS as a data import/export/transformation layer in the overall system architecture that you are deploying for at least most of your Microsoft-based applications and a few non-Microsoft applications
SQL Server 2008 : SQL Server Integration Services - SSIS Basics
As the world becomes ever more data oriented, much greater emphasis is being placed on getting data from one place to another. To complicate matters, data can be stored in many different formats, contexts, filesystems, and locations.
Defensive Error Handling : Using Transactions and XACT_ABORT to Handle Errors
In many cases, we do not need sophisticated error handling. Quite frequently, all we need to do in case of an error, is roll back all the changes and throw an exception, so that the client knows that there is a problem and will handle it.
Managing Security Within the Database Engine : Securables
Securables are objects governing the control and access of SQL Server's security system. You can grant permissions to principals to access or manage securables.
Managing Security Within the Database Engine : Database Security
The database principals include database users, database roles, and application roles. These principals control a user's rights within the database. Keep in mind that you must map Windows and SQL Server principals to database principals for the Windows and SQL Server principals to have access to the objects within the database.
Managing Security Within the Database Engine : Creating SQL Server Principals
SQL Server 2008 supports both Windows and SQL Server authentication. SQL Server authentication does the username and password validation for users attempting to gain access to SQL Server, while Windows handles the user validation for Windows-authenticated users
SQL Server 2008 : Performance Tuning - Locks, Blocking, and Deadlocks
Concurrency control is a vital part of any relational database management system and in SQL Server this is implemented primarily through Locking. Locking involves reserving resources (usually data pages) for a particular purpose; this can affect the availability of those resources. When a single task reserves lots of resources or runs for an excessive time blocking can occur, which affects system performance
SQL Server 2008 : Performance Tuning - Tracing
Half of performance tuning is finding the problem. System Monitor is the performance monitoring tool provided by Windows and this can be useful when measuring hardware performance or bottlenecks and useful in identifying the process on a server that is causing a slowdown
SQL Server 2008 : Implementing Error Handling - Managing and Raising User-Defined Errors
As mentioned, SQL Server allows you to create customized error messages and raise them inside your code. As a database developer, you should create a set list of additional messages for use by your application so you can reuse them inside your programmable objects.
SQL Server 2008 : Implementing Error Handling - Understanding Errors
Basically, SQL Server returns two types of messages: information and error. An information message is a return of some information to users. This type of message is informational in nature and doesn’t create errors at runtime.
Implementing SQL Server Objects Using Managed Code (part 2)
Similarly to CLR functions, you must register your CLR aggregates with a SQL Server database. First register the assembly containing the aggregate using CREATE ASSEMBLY.
Implementing SQL Server Objects Using Managed Code (part 1)
When creating stored procedures and functions you can accept input parameters and use output parameters to return data. You can also use return values for functions and stored procedures.
Encryption Catalog Views
Catalog views are a valuable tool in SQL Server, through which the metadata information of a database or an instance can be queried.
Built-In Cryptographic Functions
A function is a database object that contains a block of code that can be referenced in a command to return either a single value, in which case it is called a scalar function, or a set of data, in which case it is called a rowset function.
SQL server 2008 : Managing Security - Permissions
Designing a permissions strategy is important when properly securing database objects. Considering the hierarchy of securables—a database, a schema, or an object—you have options of applying permissions by either granting permissions on the database, on each schema within the database, or on each individual table or view.
SQL server 2008 : Managing Security - Schemas
Database schemas are collections of objects such as tables, views, and procedures that enable a powerful way to manage permissions.
SQL server 2008 : Managing Security - Users
Users are database-level principals that are created in order to access resources within a database. Database Users are typically mapped to a login, certificate, or asymmetric key.
SQL server 2008 : Managing Security - Roles
Like Windows groups, SQL Server provides two roles, server- and database-level roles into which logins and users can be added. Server-level roles are fixed roles that have a serverwide permission scope. Each built-in role serves a specific purpose and have the required permissions associated with them.
SQL Server 2008 : Managing Remote Servers
Remember that remote servers are supported in SQL Server 2008 for backward compatibility only. (Remote servers are being deprecated!) By definition, a remote server is a server you access as part of a client process without opening a separate, distinct, and additional direct client connection. SQL Server can manage the communication between servers using Remote Procedure Calls (RPCs).
Linked Servers
All these configuration options can also be done very easily with SQL Server Management Studio. The following sections occasionally describe that capability but focus on the SQL commands method because you will usually use this method in real-life production systems.
Adding, Dropping, and Configuring Linked Servers
All these configuration options can also be done very easily with SQL Server Management Studio. The following sections occasionally describe that capability but focus on the SQL commands method because you will usually use this method in real-life production systems.
 
 
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