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SharePoint 2010 : Scaling Service Applications Architecture

2/21/2011 5:47:01 PM
Now that you know about the basic service applications components, you need to understand how they are applied to scaling out your SharePoint 2010 environment. SharePoint environments are broken down into tiers, with Web front-end servers constituting the Web tier, application servers included in the application tier, and database servers in the database tier.

1. Web Tier

All single farm and cross-farm services can reside on the Web tier, depending on the farm’s topology. In small farms, it is likely that both the Web and application tiers will reside on the same servers.

2. Application Tier

This tier is where you’ll host your service applications. SharePoint 2010 is structured so that users do not connect directly to an application in this middle tier. Instead, users always connect to servers in the Web tier, and then their calls are proxied to servers hosting the middle tier applications. In cases in which both tiers are located physically on the same servers, users still connect to the services in the Web tier and then are connected to the service applications. Figure 1 illustrates the client-related services for a single farm implementation.

Figure 1. Client-related services


Figure 2 illustrates other services that can be installed in a single farm, but these are not services that your users will consume directly. These services support other applications that will produce information or a stable context in which information is better managed.

Figure 2. Other services available within a single farm



Note:

Single-farm services cannot be used across farm boundaries.


There are some services that can be consumed either within a farm or across a farm. For example, you can install the Managed Metadata Service (MMS) and utilize that within a single farm or utilize it across multiple farms. These services can also be consumed simultaneously within a farm and across farm boundaries. Figure 3 and Figure 4 illustrates these services.

Figure 3. Cross-farm Search roles


Figure 4. Other cross-farm services


3. Database Tier

The volume of content and business requirements for sizing will affect the number of content databases. Capacity planning for content databases is a core design function that you shouldn’t ignore. SharePoint 2010 utilizes a plethora of databases for different tasks, and ensuring that your databases stay within the size needed for efficient backup and restore operations is an important aspect of your overall design considerations.

Figures Figure 5, Figure 6, and Figure 7 help illustrate how important it is to plan correctly for the capacity your organization will require. You can see that you’ll have a number of content databases to host content that users place in your SharePoint implementation, plus other databases that will support your service applications. Figure 5 illustrates the content databases in your farm, Figure 6 illustrates the possibility of having more than one index (note that each index has a separate property store for hosting the index’s metadata), and Figure 7 illustrates other service databases that you will likely have in your deployment.

Figure 5. Content databases in SharePoint 2010


Figure 6. Search databases in SharePoint 2010


Figure 7. Other service databases in SharePoint 2010



Other -----------------
- SharePoint 2010 : Scaling Out a SharePoint Farm - Services Federation (part 2)
- SharePoint 2010 : Scaling Out a SharePoint Farm - Services Federation (part 1)
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 28) - Content Deployment
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 27) - Search
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 26) - External Service Connections
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 25) - Upgrade and Migration
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 24) - General Security
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 23) - Granular Backup
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 22) - Farm Backup and Restore
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 21)
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 20) - View Health Report
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 19) - Reporting
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 18) - Timer Jobs
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 17) - Health Analyzer
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 16) - Farm Management
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 15) - E-Mail And Text Messages
- Performing Administrative Tasks Using Central Administration (part 14)
- SharePoint 2010: Modify a Content Type
- SharePoint 2010: Create a Content Type
- SharePoint 2010 : Create a Site Column
 
 
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