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SharePoint 2010 : Managing Security - See What Permissions Are Set (part 2)

12/18/2010 9:10:36 AM

Read the Permissions Page

The name of the file or title for the item, list, or library appears in the page’s title after the word Permissions. This information helps you make sure you are viewing the permissions for the right file or item. The name of the user or group is in the first column, and the type (identifying whether it is a user or group) is in the second column. In the last column, you can see the permission set that the user or group has on the item, file, list, or library. Depending on the configuration of your server, other columns with more information about the user or group may also appear.

For example, in Figure 10.2, people in the SharePoint Team Site Visitors group can only read the file or item because they have only the Read permission, whereas SharePoint Team Site Owners can do everything to the file or item (including manage the permissions on it, delete it, and so on) because they have the Full Control permission set. The System Account (SHAREPOINT\system) group is shown to have Limited Access permissions. This type of permission can mean different things in different sites but usually means read-only permission.

It is important to note that if permissions are given to a group and then separately to a user, if that user is a member of the group, the higher permission level wins. For example, suppose user A is a member of group B, and group B has Full Control permissions on an item. Although user A was given just Read access, because user A is a member of group B, that user also has full control of the item and not just Read access. The same would apply if the situation were reversed: If user A has Full Access and that user is a member of group B, which has Read-Only access, the user still has full access to the item.

Check the Permissions for a Specific User or Group

A page’s Permission Tools ribbon, shown in Figure 2, has buttons for managing the permissions of the parent (if the file or item is inheriting from a parent), to stop inheriting permissions, and to check permissions. Clicking on the Check Permissions button opens a dialog that allows you to check what kind of permissions a certain user or group has on the file, item, list, or library, as shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3. The Check Permissions dialog.


To use the dialog, simply type the user name or group name in the User/Group box and click the Check Now button. The dialog then shows you what permission levels that person or group has on the file, item, list, or library, as shown in Figure 4.

Figure 4. The Check Permissions dialog, showing what permissions John Doe has on a document.



Other -----------------
- SharePoint 2010 : Compare Versions of a Page
- SharePoint 2010 : Discard the Check-out of a Page
- SharePoint 2010 : Publish a Page
- SharePoint 2010 : Reuse a Web Part (Export/Import)
- SharePoint 2010 : Modify a Web Part
- SharePoint 2010 : Use Built-in Web Parts (part 4) - Use the Content Query Web Part in SharePoint Server
- SharePoint 2010 : Use Built-in Web Parts (part 3) - Use the Media Web Part in SharePoint Server
- SharePoint 2010 : Use Built-in Web Parts (part 2)
- SharePoint 2010 : Use Built-in Web Parts (part 1) - Use the List View Web Part
- Examples of SharePoint Administrative Tasks (part 3) - Using Windows PowerShell During the Upgrade Process
- Examples of SharePoint Administrative Tasks (part 2) - Managing SharePoint Services
- Examples of SharePoint Administrative Tasks (part 1) - Deploying SharePoint 2010 with Windows PowerShell Scripts
- SharePoint 2010 : Add a Web Part
- SharePoint 2010 : Use the Picture Editing Control in a Page
- SharePoint 2010 : Use Wiki Syntax to Link to Existing Content and Create Pages
- Sharepoint 2010 : Use the Text Editing Control in a Page (part 3) - Add and Edit a Table
- Sharepoint 2010 : Use the Text Editing Control in a Page (part 2) - Add and Edit a Picture
- Sharepoint 2010 : Use the Text Editing Control in a Page (part 1) - Add a Hyperlink
- Working with the SharePoint 2010 Management Shell (part 9) - Performing Basic Administrative Tasks
- Working with the SharePoint 2010 Management Shell (part 8)
 
 
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