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Overview of Exchange Server 2003 Virtual Servers

5/19/2011 4:58:07 PM

Virtual Servers in a Windows Clustering Environment

Exchange virtual servers use the Windows clustering services, which are included in Windows Server 2003, Enterprise Edition, and Windows Server 2003, Datacenter Edition. These services control all aspects of Windows clustering. Back-end servers require failover support and are typically configured in a Windows clustering environment. Exchange Server 2003 uses the following Windows clustering features:

  • Resource DLL This allows Exchange Server 2003 to communicate with the Windows clustering services and customizes Exchange to provide Windows clustering functionality.

  • Groups An Exchange virtual server in a cluster is defined as a Windows cluster group containing cluster resources, such as an Internet Protocol (IP) address and Exchange Server 2003 System Attendant.

  • Resources Exchange virtual servers include the Windows clustering services, such as IP address resources, network name resources, and physical disk resources. Exchange virtual servers also include their own Exchange-specific resources.

  • Shared nothing architecture Although all nodes in the cluster can access shared data, they cannot access it at the same time. For example, if two physical disk resources are assigned to node 1 of a two-node cluster, node 2 cannot access these disk resources until node 1 fails or is taken offline, or until the disk resource is moved to node 2 manually. This feature prohibits dynamic load balancing in Windows clusters.

Virtual Servers in a Network Load Balancing Environment

Windows Server 2003 servers can be clustered to provide network load balancing. This is typically implemented on front-end servers, where load balancing is a requirement. You implement network load balancing by creating identical redundant virtual servers on all front-end servers that are part of the network load balancing cluster. In this case, the configuration of every server in the network load balancing cluster must be the same; otherwise, clients may experience different behavior depending on the server to which they are routed.


Exchange Virtual Server Requirements

An Exchange virtual server requires, at a minimum, the following resources:

  • A static IP address

  • A network name

  • One or more dedicated physical disks for shared storage

  • An Exchange 2003 Server System Attendant resource (this installs other Exchange resources)

Client computers connect to an Exchange virtual server the same way that they connect to a standalone computer running Exchange Server 2003. Windows Server 2003 provides the IP address resource, the network name resource, and the disk resources. Exchange Server 2003 provides the System Attendant resource and other required resources. When you create the System Attendant resource, all other required and dependant resources are installed.

Table 1 lists the Exchange Server 2003 components and their dependencies.

Table 1. Exchange Server 2003 Virtual Server Resources and Dependencies
ComponentDescriptionDependency
System AttendantControls the creation and deletion of all the resources in the virtual server.Network name Shared disk
Exchange storeProvides mailbox and public folder storage for Exchange Server.System Attendant
SMTPHandles relay and delivery of e-mail.System Attendant
IMAP4Provides access to e-mail messages for IMAP4 clients (optional).System Attendant
POP3Provides access to e-mail messages for POP3 clients (optional).System Attendant
HTTPProvides access to Exchange mailboxes and public folders via HTTP—for example, Microsoft Outlook 2003 Web Access (OWA).System Attendant
Exchange MS Search InstanceProvides content indexing for the virtual server.System Attendant
Message transfer agent (MTA)Responsible for communication with X.400 systems and for interoperation with Exchange Server 5.5.System Attendant
Routing serviceBuilds the link state tables.System Attendant

Note

There can be only one MTA per cluster. The MTA is created on the first Exchange virtual server. All additional Exchange virtual servers are dependent on this MTA.


Overview of POP3 Virtual Servers

POP3 allows a client to retrieve a specific user’s mail from the server. POP3 clients can access only their server inboxes; they cannot access other public or private folders. POP3 does not provide full manipulation of mail on the server. Messages can be left on the server if required, but typically, mail is downloaded to the client and then deleted. POP3 does not send e-mail—SMTP handles this.

You can configure a POP3 virtual server to grant or deny access to specific computers, groups of computers, or domains. You can grant or deny access to a single computer based on an IP address or by overriding POP3 access on a per-user basis. A group of computers can be denied or granted access based on their subnet address and mask. You can also control access to an entire domain by specifying a domain name.

You can view a list of currently connected users. You can immediately disconnect a single user from this list without disrupting the service of other connected users or denying new connection requests.

Installing Exchange Server 2003 automatically installs a default POP3 virtual server. You need to ensure that the default server supports the needs of your specific POP3 clients.

Note

The Microsoft Windows Server 2003 POP3 service is not installed on an Exchange Server 2003 server. If you want to install Exchange Server 2003, then you need to uninstall the Microsoft Windows Server 2003 POP3 service and POP3 Web Administration (if installed). Exchange uses its own Microsoft Exchange POP3 service to support POP3 clients. You need to enable this service on your Exchange server before POP3 virtual servers can start.


POP3 Virtual Server Configuration

Exchange creates the default POP3 virtual server with an IP address of (All Unassigned). As a result, the Exchange server’s IP address identifies the POP3 service on the network. By default, incoming connections use TCP port 110, and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connections use port 995. You can use the default IP address, TCP port, and SSL port, or you can assign a different IP address from any available network card. If you have more than one POP3 virtual server on an Exchange server, then each virtual server must have a unique combination of TCP port, SSL port, and IP address.

Note

To enable SSL on the POP3 virtual server, you must request and install a certificate.


By default, any POP3 client that supports basic authentication can access a POP3 virtual server. You can use selective authentication methods to restrict access, or you can list only specific computers that are allowed to use the service. To further enhance security, you can include or exclude single computers, subnets, and entire domains from accessing a POP3 virtual server.

By default, a POP3 virtual server can accept an unlimited number of inbound connections. In practice, there are limitations imposed by the finite resources of the Exchange Server 2003 server. To prevent a server from becoming overloaded, you can limit the number of connections made to the POP3 resource.

Messages sent by an Internet client are stored in an Internet format, and no message conversion occurs when a POP3 client reads the message. Messages sent by a Messaging Application Programming Interface (MAPI) client are converted from Microsoft Rich Text Format (RTF) to Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (MIME) when read by a POP3 client. If POP3 clients use UNIX to UNIX encoding (uuencode), then you can use uuencode instead of MIME when messages are converted.

Before a POP3 client can connect to a server, a mailbox-enabled user must be created in Active Directory for the client. The POP3 client will also need to be configured with account information that is necessary to allow the client to connect to the POP3 virtual server. Overriding server defaults at the user level allows you to support clients with different needs that are accessing the same POP3 virtual server.

Overview of IMAP4 Virtual Servers

Like POP3, IMAP4 allows a client to retrieve a specific user’s mail from the server. Also, IMAP4 can only retrieve e-mail from a user’s mailbox, and SMTP is used to send e-mail. There are strong similarities in the ways that POP3 and IMAP4 virtual servers are configured and managed.

IMAP4 vs. POP3

IMAP4 and POP3 are both Internet messaging protocols that allow users to access e-mail. Neither can send e-mail; SMTP is used for this purpose. The protocols differ in where users manipulate their messages. POP3 allows clients to download mail from their inboxes on a server to the client computer where messages are managed. IMAP4 allows clients to access and manage their mail on the server. Unlike POP3 users, IMAP4 users can access other public and private folders on the server if they have permission to do so.


You can configure an IMAP4 virtual server to grant or deny access to specific computers, groups of computers, or domains. You can grant or deny access to a single computer based on an IP address or by overriding IMAP4 access on a per-user basis. A group of computers can be denied or granted access based on their subnet address and mask. You can also control access to an entire domain by specifying a domain name.

You can view a list of currently connected users. You can immediately disconnect a single user from this list without disrupting the service of other connected users or denying new connection requests. You can configure an IMAP4 virtual server to list all public folders. If you disable this feature, Exchange lists only the client’s private folders.

Installing Exchange Server 2003 automatically installs a default IMAP4 virtual server. You need to ensure that the default server supports the needs of your specific IMAP4 clients.

Note

Exchange uses its own Microsoft Exchange IMAP4 service to support IMAP4 clients. You need to enable this service on your Exchange server before IMAP4 virtual servers can start.


IMAP4 Virtual Server Configuration

Exchange creates the default IMAP4 virtual server with an IP address of (All Unassigned). As a result, the Exchange server’s IP address identifies the IMAP4 service on the network. By default, incoming connections use TCP port 143, and SSL connections use port 993. You can use the default IP address, TCP port, and SSL port, or you can assign a different IP address from any available network card. If you have more than one IMAP4 virtual server on an Exchange server, then each virtual server must have a unique combination of TCP port and IP address.

Note

To enable SSL on the IMAP4 virtual server, you must request and install a certificate. If you need more information on SSL, refer to the Windows Server 2003 help files.


By default, any IMAP4 client that supports basic authentication can access an IMAP4 virtual server. You can use selective authentication methods to restrict access, or you can list only specific computers that are allowed to use the service. To further enhance security, you can include or exclude single computers, subnets, and entire domains from accessing an IMAP4 virtual server.

By default, an IMAP4 virtual server can accept an unlimited number of inbound connections. In practice, there are limitations imposed by the finite resources of the Exchange Server 2003 server. To prevent a server from becoming overloaded, you can limit the number of connections made to the IMAP4 resource.

Messages sent by Internet clients are stored in MIME format, and no message conversion takes place when IMAP4 clients read the messages. Messages sent by MAPI clients are converted from RTF to MIME when read by IMAP4 clients.

Before an IMAP4 client can connect to a server, a mailbox-enabled user must be created in Active Directory for the client. The IMAP4 client will also need to be configured with account information that is necessary to allow the client to connect to the IMAP4 virtual server. Overriding server defaults at the user level allows you to support clients with different needs that are accessing the same IMAP4 virtual server.

Overview of NNTP Virtual Servers

NNTP defines a set of client and server commands used to access newsgroups. Exchange Server 2003 uses NNTP virtual servers to enable Outlook users to participate in online discussions over the Internet. You can also enable users running client applications that support NNTP to access newsgroup public folders on computers running Exchange.

Users can read and post items to NNTP newsgroups, which are implemented in Exchange as public folders. Items in newsgroups can be replicated to Usenet host computers through newsfeeds. You can assign a moderator to a newsgroup to ensure that only approved articles are posted.

Exchange Server 2003 does not implement NNTP virtual servers by using a built-in Exchange service (unlike POP3 and IMAP4). Instead it uses the Windows Server 2003 (or Windows 2000 Server) NNTP service. This service is designed to support a stand-alone newsgroup server, and this makes it easy to create group discussions. When you install Exchange Server 2003, the NNTP service is enhanced. This enables the NNTP virtual server to interface with other news servers through newsfeeds.

Using an NNTP virtual server, you can administer newsgroup services from a centralized location and control authentication and client connections. You can create additional NNTP virtual servers to host multiple domains on a single Exchange server.

You can create both public and private virtual servers and configure different authentication requirements on each. A public news server can be used, for example, to give users quick and easy access to technical support information.

NNTP virtual servers can be used in a master/subordinate configuration. To create a master server, you use the New NNTP Feed Wizard to define a remote server as a subordinate server, rather than directly defining the server as a master server.

In Windows 2000 Server, the NNTP service starts automatically. This is not the case in Windows Server 2003, where you need to configure and start the service manually. You can customize the default NNTP virtual server settings and create and configure additional NNTP virtual servers.

You can cancel a posting, create a new newsgroup, and remove a newsgroup by sending control messages. Control messages are received by the NNTP service and posted to one of the special newsgroups that are automatically created to manage control messages. These are the control.cancel, control.newgroup, and control.rmgroup newsgroups.

NNTP Virtual Server Configuration

Exchange creates the default NNTP virtual server with an IP address of (All Unassigned). As a result, the Exchange server’s IP address identifies the NNTP service on the network. By default, incoming connections use TCP port 119, and SSL connections use port 563. You can use the default IP address, TCP port, and SSL port, or you can assign a different IP address from any available network card. If you have more than one NNTP virtual server on an Exchange server, then each virtual server must have a unique combination of TCP port, SSL port, and IP address.

By default, an NNTP virtual server can accept an unlimited number of inbound connections. In practice, there are limitations imposed by the finite resources of the Exchange Server 2003 server. To prevent a server from becoming overloaded, you can limit the number of connections made to the NNTP resource. You can also limit the length of time idle connections remain logged on to the server. By default, Exchange disconnects idle sessions after 10 minutes. You can also control the size of individual articles that a user can post, or you can limit the total size of articles that a user can post during a single connection.

You can define expiration policies to limit how long articles are stored on a newsgroup’s NNTP virtual server. An expiration policy can apply to a single newsgroup or to all newsgroups on the virtual server.

You have a number of ways of controlling access to an NNTP virtual server. You can specify whether users can connect anonymously or whether they need to supply valid usernames and passwords. If users connect over a public network, you can encrypt the connection using SSL, assuming you have obtained the necessary certificate. You can explicitly grant or deny access based on the IP address of the client, and you can include or exclude single computers, subnets, and entire domains. You can also specify the users who are permitted to administer a virtual server by restricting access to administrative tasks on the NNTP server by specifying the accounts that are authorized to modify server settings.

By default, Exchange enables basic authentication on NNTP virtual servers. To enhance security, you can use SSL with basic authentication to encrypt all information. If you use basic authentication on NNTP virtual servers, anonymous authentication is disabled. If you want to use both anonymous and basic authentication, then you need to create additional NNTP servers. Integrated Windows authentication is also available but is not a practical option in some newsgroup scenarios.

You create a new newsgroup by using the Use New Newsgroup Wizard. The NNTP service creates the directory for the newsgroup automatically, and you have the option of specifying a moderated newsgroup. You can use newsfeeds to distribute articles among multiple computers. Newsfeeds can distribute newsgroup articles between servers within your organization, and between your organization and the Internet through a Usenet host. You can use master, subordinate, and peer newsfeeds to distribute the newsgroup load among servers. A server can have both a subordinate feed and a peer feed.

A virtual directory is a public folder store that enables you to store newsgroup files on multiple disk drives. This can improve the performance of a heavily used drive and can provide more storage. Virtual directories also enable you to change the physical location of the directory without changing the name of the newsgroup.

Overview of HTTP Virtual Servers

The World Wide Web uses the HTTP protocol to define how messages are formatted and transmitted and the actions Web servers and browsers take in response to HTTP commands. Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) is an extension of the HTTP version 1.1 protocol that allows an HTTP client to retrieve and manipulate information held in the Information Store.

Exchange Server 2003 supports HTTP virtual servers and WebDAV to provide the following functions:

  • Document access HTTP and WebDAV support a collaborative environment in which users can edit documents, protect data, collect resources in a common folder, and move or copy files.

  • E-mail access HTTP and WebDAV can be used to access mailboxes and messages, notify users that new e-mail has arrived, and allow users to move, copy, or delete e-mail on the server.

  • Application access HTTP and WebDAV are standards-based application layer protocols that allow access to mailboxes and public folders through a unique Uniform Resource Locator (URL). This allows custom applications to retrieve data directly from the Information Store.

Exchange provides support for WebDAV through HTTP virtual servers. Internet Information Services (IIS) converts the folder contents displayed by the HTTP virtual server displays into Web pages and sends them to a user’s browser. The default HTTP virtual server (known as the Exchange virtual server) is created by IIS, and you must administer this server using IIS Manager. However, if you create additional HTTP virtual servers in Exchange, then you should administer them using Exchange System Manager.

A default HTTP virtual server is automatically installed, configured, and enabled when you install Exchange Server 2003. It provides users with access to public and private folders. Users can access data by using http://server_name/public to access to public folders and http://server_name/exchange/mailbox_name to access mailboxes.

HTTP Virtual Server Configuration

Exchange creates the Exchange virtual server with an IP address of (All Unassigned). As a result, the Exchange Server 2003 server’s IP address identifies the HTTP service on the network. By default, incoming connections use TCP port 80, and SSL connections use port 443. You can use the default IP address, TCP port, and SSL port, or you can assign a different IP address from any available network card. If you have more than one HTTP virtual server on an Exchange server, then each virtual server must have a unique combination of TCP port, SSL port, and IP address.

The default HTTP virtual server authentication settings vary between server roles, depending on whether the Exchange server is a front-end server or a back-end server. For example, Integrated Windows Authentication is enabled by default on a back-end, but not on a front-end, additional HTTP virtual server. Basic authentication is enabled by default on both back-end and front-end servers, and anonymous access is disabled. If you enable anonymous connections, this allows HTTP clients to access resources without specifying a Windows user account. You can also configure an HTTP virtual server to use SSL encryption, provided you first obtain and install the required certificate.

To prevent a server from becoming overloaded, you can limit the number of connections the HTTP virtual server accepts. You can also limit the length of time that idle connections remain logged on to the server. By default, Exchange Server 2003 limits the number of incoming connections to 1,000 and disconnects idle sessions after 60 seconds.

Creating Additional HHTP Virtual Servers and Virtual Directories

You can create additional HTTP virtual servers to provide for a number of different collaboration scenarios. For example, you might want to use Integrated Windows Authentication on the default virtual server, but also to provide users outside your organization with information about your company. In this situation, you can enable anonymous access on a separate HTTP virtual server.

You can use additional HTTP virtual servers to supplement access to folders that the default Web site in IIS provides. For each virtual server that you create, you must define one virtual directory as the root of the server for publishing content. You can create additional virtual directories to publish content that is not contained within the server’s own directory structure. For example, the virtual directory can provide access to a public folder (or to a mailbox) on a remote domain.

When you create a new HTTP virtual server, you must provide access to a public folder or public folder tree, and to an SMTP mailbox domain in order to configure the server’s root. You can change the default e-mail domain of the HTTP virtual server, or you can create additional virtual directories to provide access to mailboxes in multiple domains.

When you create a virtual directory, you provide users with access to the contents of a public folder through a URL that takes the form http://virtualserver/public, where virtualserver is the DNS name of the virtual server. You can also access a published directory through Microsoft Internet Explorer or through any client that supports the industry standard HTTP and WebDAV protocols. You can use Microsoft Office to create and save documents directly into an HTTP directory through a feature called Web Folders that lets you work with files and folders that are on a Web server, just as you would with files and folders in My Computer or Windows Explorer.

Controlling Access to an HTTP Virtual Server

HTTP virtual servers allow you to support a collaborative authoring environment. When you collaborate on confidential material, you need to control access to the data. You may, however, also want users outside of your organization to access public information. In this case, you can use separate HTTP virtual servers and specify different access settings on each.

You can configure read, write, and browse permissions on a virtual directory. When you set these permissions, all users are granted the same permissions to access the folders or mailboxes that the virtual directory specifies. Virtual directory settings are general restrictions imposed by IIS and do not override permissions set on the user’s account to access mailboxes and public folders.

By default, users can access private mailboxes using a URL in the form of http://server_name/exchange/mailbox_name after a standard Exchange installation and setup is complete. If you create a new mailbox store, a different URL is automatically assigned to it. This URL is based on the virtual directory name.

OWA

A default HTTP virtual server is installed and configured during the Exchange Server 2003 installation process to support OWA. You can use OWA to configure Exchange so users can access e-mail, calendar information, shared applications, and any content in the public information store by using a Web browser. To enable your users to access OWA from the Internet, your Exchange Server 2003 server must have an Internet connection, a public IP address, and a registered domain name.


OWA can be disabled for the Exchange organization by stopping the HTTP virtual server. It can also be disabled on a per-user basis.


Overview of SMTP Virtual Servers

SMTP is the Internet standard for transporting and delivering electronic messages. Exchange Server 2003 expands the SMTP service to give administrators greater control over the routing and delivery of messages and to provide secure access and channels for managing the service.

When Exchange Server 2003 is installed, it automatically installs, configures, and enables a default SMTP virtual server. You can alter settings on this server to configure security options, message delivery options, and message filtering. You can configure the SMTP virtual server and the SMTP Connector to support other messaging systems and to relay mail for IMAP4 and POP3 clients.

SMTP works closely with DNS, and you can add Mail Exchanger (MX) records in DNS to support your SMTP virtual servers. You can configure SMTP to pull e-mail, which is queued at your Internet Service Provider (ISP), through a dial-up connection.

If you have different groups of users with varying security requirements or message-size needs, then you may want to create additional SMTP virtual servers. You can also, for example, configure one virtual server to handle Internet e-mail, while another handles internal e-mail. Where you support POP3 and IMAP4 clients, you need to permit open relaying for these clients. You do not want to permit open relaying for your entire Exchange organization because this permits the propagation of junk mail. While you can use discretionary access control lists (DACLs) on a single SMTP virtual server to manage this situation, it is often safer and easier to create an additional virtual server for clients that require relaying.

Configuring an SMTP Virtual Server

The display name (for example, Default SMTP Virtual Server) and the IP address and TCP port combination identify an SMTP virtual server. You can also select the IP address that will be associated with the virtual server; by default, this is (All Unassigned). The default SMTP port is TCP port 25. Multiple virtual servers can use port 25, but you must assign a different IP address to each virtual server.

You can configure the SMTP virtual server to authenticate incoming connections and also to provide the authentication credentials required by a receiving server. Three authentication methods are available: anonymous access, basic authentication, and Integrated Windows Authentication. You can choose to use one, two, or all three methods. The default setting deactivates anonymous access on SMTP virtual servers. To allow anonymous access, you must manually disable authentication on the virtual server.

If basic authentication is enabled, you can require that all clients use Transport Layer Security (TLS) encryption to connect to an SMTP virtual server. TLS is developed from, and is similar to, SSL. This option secures the connection and encrypts the clear-text password sent by the basic authentication method. However, TLS is intended for a point-to-point SMTP connection where both parties know that the other supports TLS. It should not be used if clients access through the Internet. You need to obtain a certificate to implement TLS encryption.

You can grant or deny access to an SMTP virtual server to specific users or groups. By default, all IP addresses can access an SMTP virtual server. You can set restrictions by specifying a single IP address, a group of addresses using a subnet mask, or a Windows domain name.

You can configure an SMTP virtual server to limit the number of messages sent in a single connection. You can improve system performance by allowing the use of multiple connections to deliver messages. You can also configure message size limits and limit the number of message recipients.

Practice: Enabling and Starting the POP3, IMAP4, and NNTP Services

In this practice, you enable and start the services that are disabled by default. You then check the status of the corresponding virtual servers and start them, if required.

Exercise 1: Start the Disabled Services

By default, the default POP3, IMAP4, and NNTP virtual servers are disabled. To enable them, you need to start the relevant services. You can choose the automatic startup type if you want the service to start any time you restart the Exchange server. Choosing the manual startup type lets you decide when you want the service to start. Typically, the manual setting is used for troubleshooting. In this practice, we configure all three services on Server01 to start automatically.

Note

On your practice, two-computer network, you perform this exercise on Server01 while logged on as a domain administrator. In a production network, the Principle of Least Privilege mandates that you should use the runas utility while logged on as an ordinary user to a client computer that has the appropriate administrator tools installed.


To enable and start the disabled service, perform the following steps:

1.
Open the Services console on Server01.

2.
Right-click Microsoft Exchange POP3 and click Properties. The Properties dialog box for the service is shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. The Microsoft Exchange POP3 service Properties dialog box


3.
In the Startup Type drop-down list, select Automatic.

4.
Click Apply.

5.
Click Start.

6.
Click OK.

7.
Repeat the same procedure for the Microsoft Exchange IMAP4 service and the Network News Transport Protocol (NNTP) service.

Exercise 2: Start the POP3, IMAP4, and NNTP Virtual Servers

You cannot assume that the virtual servers will start when you enable and start the services. You must check the servers and start them as necessary.

Tip

It is wise to check that virtual servers have started any time that you restart the Exchange server. Even when the services are set to start automatically, the virtual servers do not always start on reboot.


To start the POP3, IMAP4, and NNTP virtual servers, perform the following steps:

1.
Start Exchange System Manager.

2.
Navigate to Administrative Groups\First Administrative Group\Servers\Server01\Protocols\NNTP.

Note

If Exchange System Manager is not configured to display Administrative Groups, right-click TailSpinToys (Exchange), click Properties, select the check boxes beside Routing Groups and Administrative Groups, and then click OK.

3.
Right-click Default NNTP Virtual Server. If Start is unavailable (but Stop is not), then the server has started. If not, then click Start.

4.
Expand IMAP4 and POP3 on the console pane, and repeat the same procedure for Default IMAP4 Virtual Server and Default POP3 Virtual Server.

Note

You can also determine whether or not a virtual server has started by examining its icon. If you see a white X inside a red circle, then the server is stopped. If you see two black bars inside a white circle, then the service is paused.


Exercise 3: Assign IP Addresses to Virtual Servers

To assign IP addresses, perform the following steps:

1.
Start Exchange System Manager.

2.
Navigate to Administrative Groups\First Administrative Group\Servers\Server01\Protocols\IMAP4.

3.
Right-click Default IMAP4 Virtual Server. Click Pause.

4.
Right-click Default IMAP4 Virtual Server again. Click Properties.

5.
On the General tab, in the IP Address drop-down list, select the IP address of Local Area Connection.

6.
Click Advanced to view the virtual server configuration, as shown in Figure 2. Click OK.

Figure 2. Configuring the default IMAP4 virtual server


7.
Click OK to close the Properties dialog box.

8.
Right-click Default IMAP4 Virtual Server. Click Pause.

9.
Repeat the same procedure for the POP3, NNTP, and SMTP virtual servers.

Tip

If you try to use the same procedure to configure the default HTTP virtual server (the Exchange virtual server), it will not work. Remember that the default HTTP virtual server was created using IIS, and you must use IIS Manager to configure it.

10.
Open the Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager console.

11.
Expand Server01\Web Sites, right-click Default Web Site, and click Properties.

12.
On the Web Site tab, in the IP Address drop-down list, select the IP address of Local Area Connection.

13.
Click OK to close the Properties dialog box.

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