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BizTalk Server 2009 : Using queues within asynchronous scenarios (part 3)

12/26/2010 9:03:38 AM
After building and deploying this sample, we need to assemble the necessary messaging ports from within the BizTalk Administration Console. First, import the BizTalk WCF Service Publishing Wizard-generated binding to produce our concluding WCF-NetMsmq adapter send port. After adding both a "message-type"-based subscription and BizTalk map to the send port, we build a simple FILE receive location to test our destination service. To prove that BizTalk successfully publishes to the queue, we should turn off the IIS 7.0 application pool associated with our service so that the messages are not automatically extracted from the queue by the service. If everything was set up correctly, we should be able to pick up a message, and see BizTalk drop it to the designated queue.

Now that we have BizTalk successfully acting as a MSMQ service consumer, it's time to complete our scenario and promote BizTalk to the status of MSMQ service provider as well. Lucky for us, this requires no additional development activities. Instead, we can switch our inbound receive location from being FILE-based to WCF-NetMsmq-based. In this case, we configure the in-process adapter to point to the private queue created earlier in this section.

Because we want our upstream service client to interrogate our BizTalk WCF endpoint for metadata, we should generate an IIS-hosted endpoint, which reveals our service contract. To do this, launch the BizTalk WCF Service Publishing Wizard and generate a metadata endpoint for our existing WCF-NetMsmq receive location.

Via the wizard, we want to expose a service with a one-way operation that will publish a message to the queue. If we are successful, a client application will be able to reference the MEX endpoint and import all the objects and configurations necessary to call the BizTalk hosted service. Remember that our MEX WSDL, while hosted as an HTTP endpoint, should show a service address that is MSMQ-based.

If you recall from earlier BizTalk + WCF discussions, we discovered that a BizTalk receive location needs to be in an Enabled status in order for the service to be online. Once again, MSMQ is an exception. Because there is a layer between the client and BizTalk endpoint, our BizTalk receive location (or BizTalk itself!) can be offline and the client application can still confidently distribute messages to the service. Once the BizTalk receive location returns to an active state, messages are read from the queue.

BizTalk has very strong support for MSMQ, and in scenarios with very disconnected clients possessing volatile uptime or specific throttling requirements, an intermediary queue offers a convenient way to reliably transfer data between systems.

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